The Deaf Bulletin 2019 Issue 1

The Deaf Bulletin 2019 Issue 1

The Deaf Bulletin 2019 Issue 1

Remembering 2018

The journey for the independence and equality of the Deaf community in particular and persons with disabilities in general is similar to climbing a mountain. It has been one step at a time and sometimes 2 steps backwards. The year 2018 saw many great developments aimed at improving the lives of the Deaf. However, some not so good things happened. Here are some highlights from 2018.

  • The Sign Language syllabus was developed and validated and now we wait for implementation and expansion to other grades.
  • The bid for the inclusive education policy was done and we await to see the start of the work.
  • The Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education seeks to develop a Deaf education strategy.
  • There was an increase in the number of Deaf people who participated in the 2018 elections as registered voters in comparison to previous elections.
  • The ZRP victim friendly unit are developing and enthusiastic about learning Sign Language.
  • There was increased use of Sign Language on state media. More dramas on ZBC TV have captions.
  • 6 Deaf people started the journey to higher education some training as social workers and others as teachers.
  • Unfortunately, a Deaf man was shot and injured during the August 1 Violence in Harare.
  • Many Deaf people lost their livelihoods as city clean up campaign was done.

The importance of seeking justice when a crime is committed against you.

When a crime has been committed against you like rape, assault or theft, it is important to seek justice. Justice means different things to different people, and reporting a crime to the police is an individual decision. However, every individual regardless of who they are has the right to justice.

Many people decide to report to the police as the first step in seeking justice for the crime by holding the criminal accountable for their actions. It may not be an easy decision to make especially in cases of violent crimes but it’s a choice that may have a positive impact on one’s recovery. Some survivors say that reporting and seeking justice helped them recover and regain a sense of control over their lives. Understanding how to report and learning more about the experience can take away some of the unknowns and help you feel more prepared in terms of your journey to recovery.

When a person with disability experiences any form of violence they have the option to report the case to the police for criminal prosecution or claim damages in civil action through the nearest court. When one goes to the police station to report their case, they can ask for the Victim Friendly Unit and here, you can request for an interpreter to come and assist you or you can bring your own interpreter, if you feel that is a better option. When you have been violated in any way. it is advisable to report to the police as soon as possible. That way, you will have a peace of mind knowing that you have taken one criminal out of the world and made it a safer place. It also goes a long way towards personal healing.

Taking the lead in promoting Sign Language Interpretation

A sign Language Interpreter is a professional I would describe as a worker bee. Worker bees toil with a die-hard level of commitment, So does an interpreter, particularly a Sign Language interpreter. Sign Language interpretation as a profession has been ignored for a long time and yet it is important in helping the Deaf access information.

Sign Language Interpretation

The best way of promoting Sign Language Interpretation is to acknowledge the importance and impact it has in everyday life. It is high time that Zimbabwe understands the work of Sign Language interpreters. Sign Language interpreters are essential in the daily lives of the Deaf as they engage with the world around them. Interpreters are needed in health settings, courts, police, family gatherings, education and national events.
The importance of interpreters in everyday life came to the fore when a Deaf staff member at Deaf Zimbabwe Trust’s daughter was doing some traditional rites of “kusungirwa” when a married woman returns from her husband to be supported as she gives birth and how to raise the baby by her mother.

The best way of promoting Sign Language Interpretation is to acknowledge the importance and impact it has in everyday life. It is high time that Zimbabwe understands the work of Sign Language interpreters. Sign Language interpreters are essential in the daily lives of the Deaf as they engage with the world around them. Interpreters are needed in health settings, courts, police, family gatherings, education and national events.
The importance of interpreters in everyday life came to the fore when a Deaf staff member at Deaf Zimbabwe Trust’s daughter was doing some traditional rites of “kusungirwa” when a married woman returns from her husband to be supported as she gives birth and how to raise the baby by her mother.

On this occasion, the mother who is Deaf needed someone to translate to her the proceedings to allow her to participate fully and fulfill her role as mother. In the past, such events including funerals, weddings and memorial services would go without being interpreted for the Deaf. They would sit through them without understanding what was going on. Knowing the importance of Sign Language interpreters has resulted in greater demand for Sign Language interpreters. With professional Sign Language interpreters, Deaf people are included and no one is left behind.

#Interpretationgoals2019.

#TakingSignLanguagetothePeople.

The Deaf Bulletin 2019 Issue 1

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